Conversations For Transformation: Essays Inspired By The Ideas Of Werner Erhard

Conversations For Transformation

Essays By Laurence Platt

Inspired By The Ideas Of Werner Erhard

And More


Enough Time

Shoreline Highway, Marin Headlands, California, USA

October 28, 2010



This essay, Enough Time, is the third in the sextology Time:
  1. Time On My Hands
  2. I'm Playing So Hard I've Got No Time To Be Busy
  3. Enough Time
  4. Moving Time Around
  5. One Day One Life: A Reflection On Time
  6. Maybe Time Isn't Linear
in that order.

I am indebted to the source of Mission Control who inspired this conversation.




This conversation isn't about magically  acquiring more than the traditional twenty fours hours in every day so at last  there's enough time to do everything there is to do. Neither is this conversation about making  the time to do the things you want to do by taking time away  from things which aren't as important - this isn't a conversation about prioritizing  a "to do" list. Neither is this a conversation about time management. There's a veritable plethora of perfectly good time management workshops, seminars, courses, and books already available. I'm not aspiring to create another one of them.

Rather, what this conversation is is a way of looking at  the availability of time. Specifically, it's a way of looking at the recurring concern "There's not enough time" / "I don't have enough time" which, if you tell the truth about it, is what time almost always  looks like. It's a way of looking at how we look at  this recurring concern. More to the point, it's a way of looking at how we don't  look at this recurring concern - very Zen, very revealing. Interimly what this conversation is is a valuable way of reassessing the recurring concern "There's not enough time" / "I don't have enough time.". Ultimately what this conversation is is a powerful way of vanquishing this recurring concern as a racket.

I assert the racket "There's not enough time" / "I don't have enough time" is patently silly. There's enough time. You've got enough time. You've always  got enough time. There's as much time now as there ever is. There's as much time now as there's always been. In fact, there's only  as much time as there is now. There's never been any more time than there is now. There's never been any less  time than there is now.

<aside>

Ideas about what happens with time in curved space and what happens with time when traveling faster than the speed of light, while interesting, don't impact the racket "There's not enough time" / "I don't have enough time" for most ordinary human beings I know who'll never see curved space or travel faster than the speed of light.

<un-aside>

When I'm concerned there's not enough time (that is to say when I'm running a racket  "There's not enough time" / "I don't have enough time"), if I tell the truth about it, I'm really not being responsible for what I'm doing. Actually its way more subtle  than that. It's when I'm running that racket, I'm really not being responsible for what I'm not  doing. Being responsible for what I'm doing is an obvious topic for an entry level  conversation about being responsible. However, being responsible for what I'm not  doing is profound. It's a topic which only occurs in an adult, senior  conversation about being responsible.

Here's an adult, senior conversation about being responsible: regarding anything there is for me to do, I'm in one of three mutually exclusive  states:

 1)  I'm not  doing it.
 2)  I'm never  doing it.
 3)  I'm doing it.

Given the racket "There's not enough time" / "I don't have enough time", consider this:

 1)  If I'm not  doing it, it's not because "There's not enough time" / "I don't have enough time". It's because I'm not doing it.
 2)  If I'm never  doing it, it's not because "There's not enough time" / "I don't have enough time". It's because I'm never doing it.

Actually those two are secondary. What's primary  is this:

 3)  If I'm doing  it, it's not because "There's enough  time" / "I have enough  time". It's because I'm doing it.

Gee! I hope you get this. Really!



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