Conversations For Transformation: Essays Inspired By The Ideas Of Werner Erhard

Conversations For Transformation

Essays By Laurence Platt

Inspired By The Ideas Of Werner Erhard

And More


GoFundMe

One Size Fits All

VJB Vineyards & Cellars, Kenwood, California, USA

June 16, 2021



"For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?" ... Jesus Christ quoted by both Matthew and Mark the apostles

"Wealth is like an addiction." ... Abigail Disney

"Too much is never enough." ... David Bowie

"I never wanted to be anybody else." ... Peter Fonda embodying Wyatt Williams, Easy Rider
This essay, One Size Fits All, is the companion piece to


When friends (all people, actually) share themselves with me, what their intimate thoughts are, what their concerns are, what future(s) they're living from (for worse or for better), what they're working on  in their lives right now, I experience it as a very personal gift. And while I may experience it as a personal gift of which I'm the principle recipient, the generosity of the act of authentic sharing is a gift with widespread benefits for everyone. All parties to intimate, open, authentic sharing (and even those merely in close proximity to it) are enriched and expanded by it. Why? It's simple: because human beings are that way.

She was thinking out loud about how great it was that a friend of hers was buying a second home, specifically how great it was that a friend of hers could afford  to buy a second home. In so doing, she overlooked something pertinent: the truth of the matter is she's doing fine financially. Yet she held the allure of a second home like a litmus test  that shows what she currently has, to be somewhat inadequate. In her view, she would like to be like her friend ie she would like to be able to afford a second home. Here's the catch: to have what her friend has, she would have to be  her friend. She didn't get that yet. And if she took on being  her friend, she'd take on what her friend has that she wants, but she'd also have to take on all the unknowns about her friend's life that she may not yet know she doesn't  want.

What she also didn't get yet, was this: her friend had just been diagnosed with a rare medical condition, something arduous, an ordeal that had only just begun. If she was going to be  her friend and so have a second home, she would have to assume the medical condition as well. It's all or nothing. It's total. The process isn't pick and choose. I proposed that she'd be better of as herself with only one home, and no medical condition to deal with, than with two homes and a medical condition.

On another note, individuals with great wealth yet with no integrity, are legion. If integrity in finance isn't outright bypassed, then it's tacitly ignored in a manner that's par for the course. So which would she rather have, I asked: great wealth? or her integrity intact? Having great wealth would appear  (on the surface at least) to be desirable. But would she take it on, I asked, at the cost of her own integrity? (remember: to have what they have, you have to be what they are).

I continued wondering out loud with her: could it be that on balance  of it all, there's really not much difference between any of our lives? - that is to say, could it be that on balance of it all, there's really not much difference in the totality of the quality of life each of us has the power to generate? We each have more stuff in some areas of life (some would say we're more blessed  in some areas of life) than in others; we each have less in some areas of life (some would say we're less blessed in some areas of life) than in others. On balance of it all, could it be that there's really not much difference in the totality of the quality of life each of us can generate?

When it comes to life ie when it comes to a  life ie when it comes to our  lives, could it be that one size fits all?  Is the Queen of England's life as lived in totality, really any worse or better than that of a Maasai tribesman herding cattle? (and not just in actuality: as a compelling possibility). I mean really? Look: there's no sense in that observation / question unless our lives are taken as lived (the operative) in totality. For example, one casualty of great wealth and renown, is anonymity / privacy eg the ability to take a quiet stroll around San Francisco Bay Area's piers unnoticed. How do you quantify the cost of anonymity? How do you quantify it when it's lost?

I never wanted to be anybody else. On balance of it all, there's no worse or better life than the one I have. When it comes to the life each of us has, one size fits all.



Communication Promise E-Mail | Home

© Laurence Platt - 2021 Permission