Conversations For Transformation: Essays Inspired By The Ideas Of Werner Erhard

Conversations For Transformation

Essays By Laurence Platt

Inspired By The Ideas Of Werner Erhard

And More


Leadership III:

Unflinching

Napa Valley, California, USA

October 31, 2013



This essay, Leadership III: Unflinching, is the third in the trilogy Leadership inspired by Werner Erhard and The Leadership Course: Being a Leader and the Effective Exercise of Leadership: An Ontological / Phenomenological Model: It is also the sixth in a septology on Workability: Conversations For Transformation receives its eight hundred thousandth view with the publishing of Leadership III: Unflinching.

I am indebted to Joseph Kempin and to Sarah Thomas and to the creators of The Leadership Course and to the participants in The Leadership Course and to the graduates of The Leadership Course who inspired this conversation.




Foreword To The Leadership trilogy:

The three essays which comprise this Leadership trilogy aren't about The Leadership Course per se. Neither do they purport to authoritatively recreate any of the underlying abstracts of it or any of the specific ideas disseminated in it or any of the distinctions distinguished in it.

Rather what they are ie their raison d'etre  is they're inspired by ie each of them come from conversations with participants in The Leadership Course and with graduates of The Leadership Course who generously shared their experience of it with me.



In this, the now forty second year of the conversation for transformation we are, ever-expanding in and around the world, we speak a lot about a certain way of being, a way of being which is distinct from thinking, distinct from interpreting, distinct from opining. This way of being is simply standing, looking into the space, observing whatever's there, then saying ie discovering  whatever's there.

This manner of communication ie this aspect of complete and total and full Self-expression is literally - starting with where I'm standing - the shortest possible distance between two points. In saying whatever's there without detouring via thinking, without detouring via interpreting, and without detouring via opining, I cross the gap in front of me as fast as it's possible to do so, eschewing the longer, circuitous, rambling routes of thinking, interpreting, and opining. It's the pragmatic way of being in the world. It's always available. It's a direct access  to distinguishing what works in Life. And what works in Life, once distinguished, calls forth the possibility of living my life aligned with it.

Life works. What works in Life isn't hidden. What works in Life is plainly visible. It leaves clues everywhere. Distinguishing what works clearly, however, requires setting aside ie requires bracketing  all my thinking, all my interpreting, and all my opining long enough to let what works show up all by itself  as unfiltered by thinking and interpreting and opining as possible.

What gets in the way of what works showing up all by itself (which is to say what gets in the way of discovering what works showing up all by itself) ... is you  (I include myself in this generalized you - it's all of us). It's an easy mistake to make: looking for what works in Life itself, without first looking at ie without first getting clear about what doesn't work in my own life. That's what gets in the way. The world is always mauve to those who wear mauve tinted spectacles (unknowingly or knowingly), and it's not to those who don't.

It's one thing observing the apple falling from the tree and, by saying what I'm observing, discovering gravity works. It's a phenomenon which plays out clearly on the big screen right in front of my eyes, is easy to look at, and is easy to get. It's a thing of an entirely different order, to look at and to get what doesn't work in my own life.

What doesn't work in my own life, doesn't always play out on a clear screen. What doesn't work in my own life, isn't always easy to look at. And the thing about it is it's essential  for me to be clear about whatever doesn't work in my own life before I attempt to take on the greater issue of what works in Life itself. I can look at the apple falling from the tree, unhurrying. But to accurately observe whatever doesn't work in my own life, I have to look unflinching.

In the inquiry which fleshes out workability ie in the inquiry which fleshes out what works (that's workability as a generality, as an abstract), when you can tell me what doesn't work in your own life, you're half way there. Then, on that platform, when you can tell me what works in Life itself, that's the other half (as Werner Erhard may have said). Oh, and speaking authentically? You must tell me each half in that order.



Communication Promise E-Mail | Home

© Laurence Platt - 2013 through 2017 Permission