Conversations For Transformation: Essays Inspired By The Ideas Of Werner Erhard

Conversations For Transformation

Essays By Laurence Platt

Inspired By The Ideas Of Werner Erhard

And More




Nothing But Being

Not Yet Located

Not Yet Dated



"Just like the front and the back of the hand, being and action are distinct yet inseparable." ... 
"We put who we are  into the space." ... Paul Roth, Production Logistics Manager for the Berkeley / Oakland est center, circa 1978
This essay, Nothing But Being, is the companion piece to
  1. Presence Of Self
  2. Come Back To Being
  3. (working title)
in that order.

I am indebted to Paul Roth who inspired this conversation and contributed material.




Work in progress.

* * *

"Just like the front and the back of the hand, being
and action are distinct yet inseparable." ... Werner

Image by Wernher Krutein / photovault.com

Valley Of The Moon, Sonoma County, California, USA

Thursday midday October 12, 1978

Click to expand
Werner Erhard

Some of my favorite people, principal among whom is Alan Watts, have espoused ideas along the lines of "All you have to do is be" (which roughly translates to "All that's required  of you is to be") or "Being is enough" (which roughly translates to "Being is whole, full, and complete") ... something like that. And given our already always listening, when they say "Being is enough" we come perilously close to hearing it as "Doing nothing is enough" ie the "nothing" like "doing no-thing" like no action, like being idle permanently (rather than the exquisite Zen of "doing nothing" which is the subject for another conversation on another occasion).

Life being what it is, doing nothing like no action, like being idle permanently, isn't practical (I'm not even sure if it's possible - unless you're in a coma).

Listening Werner, I've resolved for myself that purely being, isn't doing nothing like no action, like being idle permenently. Being and action, while distinct, are inseparable. If you be, you can't avoid acting entirely. You be ... and you act. That's how it is for us humans. So what is it then, when "being is enough", when "being is whole, full, and complete"? That's the nature of this inquiry (in particular, what promotes being as enough, and what gets in its way of being enough).

* * *

Nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being.

Nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being.

Nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being.

Nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being nothing but being.

* * *

  Coming soon.   



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