Conversations For Transformation: Essays Inspired By The Ideas Of Werner Erhard

Conversations For Transformation

Essays By Laurence Platt

Inspired By The Ideas Of Werner Erhard

And More


Warmer In The Water

Waimānalo Beach, O'ahu, Hawai'i, USA

July 9, 2010



This essay, Warmer In The Water, is the fifth in a group of seven on Surfing: It is also the second in a group of five written in Hawai'i: I am indebted to Kihā "Billy" Pimental who inspired this conversation.



Photography by Victoria Hamilton-Rivers - Waikīkī Beach, Honolulu, O'ahu, Hawai'i, USA - 5:39pm Friday July 9, 2010 Laurence Platt
Warmer In The Water
I grew up not far from the beach - on  the beach as much as possible in fact when left to my own devices. It's been said about me if you look closely in the sea water stream flowing through my veins, you may find traces of blood. Throughout my life I've noticed if I close my eyes then open them again, I see I've gravitated back to the beach in the interim. Some of the most extraordinary pads  I've ever lived in and some of the most extraordinary experiences I've ever had in them are, not suprisingly, on the beach. The opportunity of living on the beach isn't simply to be close enough to view, to hear, and to smell  the ocean. It's to be in  the ocean.

Being in the ocean is and always has been like a baptism for me. Baptism as a full body immersion in water is a total  experience. This is the sense in which being in the ocean is like a baptism: it's a total experience. Yet unlike what often goeswith  (as Alan Watts may have said) a religious experience like baptism, being in the ocean is devoid of significance. It's much, much more immediate  than that.

In this regard I don't have any notches on my belt. Whatever I do is whatever I do. I don't assign importance  to what I do. But if I did carve notches on my belt to denote things I'm happy for having experienced and proud of having accomplished, it's appropriate one of them would be for sourcing and participating in a near decade long conversation which resulted exactly as intended in Werner's work coming back to Hawai'i.

There's nothing special about Hawai'i in this regard. My life is given by the possibility "Werner's work is available". Everywhere. For everyone. With no one and nothing left out. Hawai'i fits into this  context. It's not the other way around. That said, when you bring together two of the most magnanimous, sublime, angelic contexts in the universe - transformation, and the epitome of life by and in the ocean - the spontaneous inspired excitement which occurs like ocean spray thumping up through a blowhole in the rock at the edge of Kawela Bay is palpable, riveting, irrestible. There's no reason  for doing any of this here. There's no reason to stand for the possibility of transformation in Hawai'i or anywhere else for that matter. It doesn't occur this way for me. I don't require a reason. Rather, it's a calling. And I notice what's so is without hesitation, I'm answering.

One of the extraordinary aspects of this state (double entendre  intended) is it's warmer in the water than it is on the beach, and the beach is a balmy eighty degrees. This means I can surf as long as I want to surf rather than until I'm too cold to surf any more. There's an incredible freedom in this which in this form isn't readily available everywhere. As my surfboard responds to the slightest shift of my weight, I'm not concerned with where I'll be when this ride ends: still on my surfboard or in the water. And if I do end up in the water, that's fine with me too. It's warmer in the water.

Transformation is also this way. It's warmer when I'm in it, when I'm living it, when I'm expressing it than when I'm sitting tight holding on to what I got in fear of losing it, not risking for anything greater. Like I said, transformation and life by and in the ocean have a lot in common. What they don't have in common is transformation is available like a possibility  for everyone everywhere.



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