Conversations For Transformation: Essays Inspired By The Ideas Of Werner Erhard

Conversations For Transformation

Essays By Laurence Platt

Inspired By The Ideas Of Werner Erhard

And More


Being With What's There

Connolly Ranch, Browns Valley, California, USA

May 23, 2016



"As stupid as it sounds, it's true there's a sense of joy with simply being with what's there."  ... 


The listening is critical. The context is decisive. One of the most obvious ways in which the essential conversation for transformation is very likely to be misconstrued is when it is spoken in a context in which there is neither the agreement nor a request nor any invitation for transformation to be spoken in the first place. That's deadly.

Outside of a transformed context (or at least outside of a context in which there's an agreement for transformation to be spoken), promoting the idea that it's possible to experience being whole and complete and satisfied exactly the way we are (and exactly the way we aren't), can be a hard sell. Indeed it may never be gotten at all. And even if it is gotten but not in context, it can elicit "Why even bother? Why aspire to anything  if it's all already whole and complete?". Listen: artists are well known for touting not  being whole and complete and satisfied, as an essential driver of their creativity - that is typical when "whole and complete" is mis-heard as "finished".

As a species and as individuals, we've aspired to so much, and we've accomplished so much - some of it terrible, some of it wonderful. Yet so many of our efforts and resources are jaw-droppingly mis-allocated, given what's wanted and needed (not to mention what's possible) on our planet. In this conversation, it's worth examining how much we seek to accomplish, driven by ie expecting that once we've accomplished it (whatever it is) then  we'll enjoy wholeness and completion and satisfaction.

Many of you have already cottoned on to the cosmic joke which has been played on humanity for hundreds of millennia: no matter what we aspire to, no matter what we accomplish, there is nothing we'll ever do, the accomplishing of which will give us the experience of being whole and complete and satisfied. Nothing. On the other hand, there's a way of experiencing our already  wholeness and completion and satisfaction that's here to begin with, so the wholeness and completion and satisfaction that is already present with us, bursts forth in all that we then do. Congruently all that we then do is an explicit expression of being whole and complete and satisfied.

Transformation is the state of ie is the onset of ie is the access to experiencing being whole and complete and satisfied to begin with. Then wholeness and completion and satisfaction is present for us, and it bursts forth in all that we do ... and  ... all that we do is no longer done in order to  become whole and complete and satisfied. Experiencing being whole and complete and satisfied is already available in simply being ie in being the being we are prior to  doing all that we do - said another way, it's already available in simply being with. "Wait! It's already available in simply being ... with what, Laurence?" you may ask. I say it's already available in simply being with what's there. Simply being with what's there, comes impregnated with the sense of wholeness and completion and satisfaction (and joy - sometimes called bliss).

The ancient Hindu mystics and Vedic  pundits had a name for this. They called it "satchitananda"  which roughly translates from the Sanskrit to "the bliss (ananda)  of being conscious of (chit)  the absolute (sat)"  - in other words "absolute bliss consciousness" (it is the so-called absolute  component of which refers of course to just what's there). And whereas the ancient Hindu mystics and Vedic pundits invested a lot of time and energy and practicing trying to realize this state they called absolute bliss consciousness, in noticing the absolute is just what's there, Werner shares there's a sense of joy (ie bliss) simply being with it (ie being conscious of it). That said, it's really important to notice there's nothing significant in this (just look how careful he is to ensure that: by pre-qualifying his share with "As stupid as it sounds ...").

That's very Werner. If I were an ancient Hindu mystic or a Vedic pundit or even just an artist, I'd be sitting bolt upright paying attention, listening him intently, raptly.



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